Hokusai works in NFT

As works in NFT format have shaken the art world since the boom experienced by the artist Beeple in early 2021 - whose digital work has sold for more than 69 million dollars - the auction market is getting up to speed. Called The Unvirtual Sale, this Parisian sale will be a world-first since it will take place with an auctioneer and bidders present physically but also in the metaverse, who will interact as during a traditional auction. A first which had to be up to date with French regulations on the question: "In the context of French regulations only authorizing the sale of material goods, each NFT work will have a physical representation, and it is this last to be put up for sale. This physical work will be associated with an NFT of which the successful bidder will become the owner”, explains the catalog of the sale in its preamble. Above all, the public will be able to attend the sale from anywhere on the planet, since they will be able to enter the metaverse dedicated to the sale, whether or not they have a virtual reality headset. A space of 1,000 m2, replicated in the metaverse in 3D and visible at 360°, will also be accessible to admire the works even if this last option will allow even more immersion. A NEW FORM OF SPONSORSHIP A total of 51 lots will be distributed during this unique event, with estimates ranging from 500 to more than 70,000 euros. And if NFT enthusiasts will be able to find works in 3D, eyes will be turned in particular to paintings and prints by Hokusaï (1760-1849), which specialists in Japan know well. While the master's works will be offered in Non-fungible token format, the originals remain physically in the British Museum. Therefore, the establishment digitized them before making NFT copies, each one is certified authentic. Blockchain technology then makes it possible to certify that a person is indeed the sole owner in its digital form. For museums, NFTs bring a new economic model to attract patrons with an unprecedented form of gratification. By analogy, the Louvre could choose to sell the famous Mona Lisa in the form of NFT. Its owner would not have Leonardo da Vinci's painting physically but could display it in the metaverse and even prove that he is the sole holder of it. The Louvre Museum can then use the money from the sale to finance its restoration, for example. Above all, the museum can specify in this smart contract (smart contract registered in the blockchain ), that it could automatically receive 20, 30, or 40% in the event of resale. seen in Cnews - Nicolas Cailleaud CNN: NFT marketplace suspends sales after the discovery of fakes and plagiarism

Hokusai works in NFT

As works in NFT format have shaken the art world since the boom experienced by the artist Beeple in early 2021 - whose digital work has...