Brussels Gallery WE, 9 to 12 September 15 exhibitions not to miss.

Dependance: Lucie Stahl Berlin artist Lucie Stahl paints a portrait of our consumer society. She became known for its large formats produced using a scanner. By placing damaged found objects such as rubbish, newspaper clippings, or food on the glass of a scanner, she takes strange photographs of our world that betray a gaze that is both critical and fascinated. Xavier Hufkens: Huma Bhabha and Lynda Benglis Two names not to be missed at Xavier Hufkens, namely Huma Bhabha and Lynda Benglis. Each benefits from a solo show in the gallery two spaces. Octogenarian artist Lynda Benglis presents a set of paper sculptures that she creates in dialogue with large bronzes, a material that shares with paper a capacity for transformation under the effect of primary elements. For the first time in this gallery, Huma Bhabha presents new sculptures and drawings irrigated by questions linked to war and colonialism. Harlan Levey Projects: Jeroen Jongeleen Harlan Levey is showcasing in the new and second space he has just opened, in Molenbeek, the photographs and videos of Dutch artist Jongeleen. The latter presents recent works from the Running in Circles series as well as older works that allow us to take stock of the last twenty years of work by the artist who never ceases to question our controlling society. Galerie Greta Meert: Louise Lawler The famous American artist is invited to the Galerie Greta Meert this fall. A key figure in American postmodernity, she uses photography to question art's political and institutional framework and our perception of it. For her 5th solo show at the gallery, the artist offers a variation around a photograph of Warhol to which she subjected various deformations and disturbing photographs from the exhibition devoted recently to Donald Judd at MoMA. Michel Rein: Piero Gilardi Do not miss the opportunity to discover this fall both recent and historical works by Piero Gilardi. Crossed since the 1960s by questions of an ecological nature, this Italian artist creates “nature rugs” (between painting and sculpture), inviting us to look at what we often forget to look at. Protagonist of the first exhibitions of Arte Povera at the end of the 1960s, he uses this poor material that is polyurethane foam, which he sculpts and covers in bright colors. Daniel Templon: Philippe Cognée Galerie Templon opens its Brussels season with a solo show by Philippe Cognée, which presents a new series of paintings entitled The Eye of the Cyclone. Inspired by photos and videos, this French painter examines the relationship that man has with his environment. At a time of the omnipotence of new technologies, he uses heated and ground wax in his paintings, which makes the image even more inaccessible. Baronian Xippas: Yves Zurstrassen The Belgian artist is in the spotlight at Baronian. The painter oscillates between lyrical abstraction and abstract expressionism. His paintings show a whole game of superimposed layers and withdrawals that highlight the gesture in action. The violence and spontaneity of this gesture are as if defused or at least thwarted by the delicacy of the floral or stellar motifs used. Marie-Laure Fleisch: Christine Ödlund Interested in both science and esotericism, Christine Ödlund develops a work on the borders of the visible and the invisible, which brings together the world of humans and that of plants. Her recent creations lead us to rethink our relationship with nature and to realize the limits of human knowledge. Ballon Rouge Collective: ana Čvorović Bosnian artist Ana Čvorović presents her works produced for the 2019 project, Borders Unfold, her murals created in London during the confinement. Translucent, sculptures are like so many floating islands in fluorescent colors that invite us to navigate in a more than uncertain present. Clearing: Dedobbeleer Two artists are in the spotlight at the Clearing Gallery: Koenraad Dedobbeleer and Matt Copson. The first presents a series of recent works in glass produced in Murano. The second gives the second of his laser opera in three acts: Age of Coming, Coming of Age and Of Coming Age. The opera tells the story of a newborn in conflict with a vengeful god who tries to convince him of life's vanity, causing the baby's rebellion who then seeks to turn the situation around. Galerie Félix Frachon: Nandita Kumar Galerie Félix Frachon presents Indian artist Nandita Kumar. At the intersection of art and science, his work consists of interactive installations that combine sound, video and a whole range of technological equipment with, on the horizon, a future respectful of natural balances and concerned with harmony between man and the planet. Meessen De Clercq: Nicolás Lamas Of Peruvian origin, artist Nicolás Lamas, now living in Brussels, confronts worlds, cultures and eras, through collusions of astonishing objects that he gleans during his encounters. He creates his “sculptures” using both objects that point to Antiquity and ultratechnological artefacts, thus generating strange fictions. It operates a blurring of our perceptions and our benchmarks, to better scrutinize our memory, our identity as human beings and the emerging future. Bernier / Eliades Gallery: Valérie Mannaerts The 40-year-old Belgian artist Valérie Mannaerts offers paintings, embroidery and installations that are now her trademark. She constructs sculptural installations that function as so many strange and often whimsical staging, in which canvases and objects coexist, blurring scales and identities. La Patinoire Royale: Alice Anderson Nominated for the last Marcel Duchamp Prize, Alice Anderson presents some of the works produced for this occasion. Considering the body as a vector of humanity in a world engaged in all-technology, the artist produces his works at the end of highly ritualized performative processes. We were able to discover during his last show at the gallery his work based on copper wires; we can now contemplate his crumpled papers and his creations based on colored threads. Maruani Mercier: Ross Bleckner Haunted by the brevity of life, the paintings of the American artist Ross Bleckner use a whole symbolic imagery made up of candelabras, doves, and flowers bathed in a fuzzy light. His new exhibition at the Galerie Maruani Mercier is no exception to the rule. Produced this year, his new “atmospheric” paintings of flowers in bright colors exude a sweet melancholy. © Pauline Vidal for le Journal des Arts

Brussels Gallery WE, 9 to 12 September 15 exhibitions not to miss.

Dependance: Lucie Stahl Berlin artist Lucie Stahl paints a portrait of our consumer society. She became known for its large formats...